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Apple Phyllo Napoleons

September 15, 2011

Apple Phyllo Napoleons

Apple Phyllo Napoleons

It’s apple season!!!  Are you excited?  I am pumped!! I love apples.  They are truly one of natures more nourishing gifts.  Last weekend we took a road trip in search of some U-Pick apple farms.  We were successful in our pursuit and happened upon quite a few different farms.  The farm that we went to was Willowbank U-Pick farm.  They have all sorts of seasonal U-Picks that run through out the spring, summer and fall.  Have you ever picked your own apples?  It’s a lot of fun and a wonderful way to teach children about farms and where exactly their food comes from.

With apples now in season I am excited to share with you all sorts of new and wonderful recipes.  I am super duper excited about getting to bake fresh apple pies, apple sauce and perhaps some apple butter.  Apple butter is a new one for me and I don’t have much experience with it but I am certainly going to cross it off my list of things to do very soon.

After we returned from picking apples I was on the look out for something different to create and that’s when I stumbled upon these apple phyllo napoleons.  They caught my attention straight away.  Truth be told I love phyllo, it’s butter, flaky and well just pure heaven.  These napoleons are so easy to make.  They really aren’t very time consuming and they look absolutely stunning on a plate.  Do you think that might be something you would be interested in?  Let me tell you this may be your new go to apple dessert.

Apple Phyllo Napoleons

Ingredients

Apples

6 apples (I used Gravenstiens; you may also use Gala, or Golden Delicious)

5 tablespoons sugar

2 teaspoons lemon juice

2 tablespoons butter

Phyllo

2 ounces pecans, toasted

1/2 cup sugar

4 sheets phyllo, defrosted

4 ounces butter, melted

Cinnamon Cream

1 1/4 cups heavy cream

3 tablespoons sugar

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

To Prepare the Apple Phyllo Napoleons

Peel, core, and slice the apples about 1/8 inch thick.  Cook the apples, sugar,  lemon juice, and butter in a sauté pan over medium heat until the apples are soft but not mushy. Transfer to a bowl and let cool to room temperature.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper. Finely grind the pecans and sugar in a food processor.

You will need a fairly large surface to work with the phyllo. Keep the sheets you are not using to the side under plastic wrap and damp towel. Take a single sheet of phyllo and lay it flat on the work surface. Brush the phyllo with some of the melted butter and sprinkle with a quarter of the pecan sugar. Lay a second sheet of phyllo on top and repeat the process. Do the same with the other two sheets of phyllo.

Trim the phyllo  into a 16 x 12 inch rectangle.  Kitchen shears or a pizza cutting wheel will work; a sharp knife works as well but be careful when dragging it not to tear the phyllo. Cut the rectangle into 3 x 4 inch rectangles. Using a spatula transfer the rectangles to the baking sheets. Bake about 10 minutes or until they have turned golden brown and crispy.

Meanwhile, combine the cream, sugar, and cinnamon in a mixing bowl and whip until soft peaks form.

Place a rectangle on a plate. Place some of the apples and then some of the cream on top. Place another rectangle on top. Serve immediately.

Makes 8 servings

Adapted from Emily Luchetti’s A Passion for Desserts

Apple Phyllo Napoleons

Apple Phyllo Napoleons

These napoleons are a real treat.  They are so easy to make and a great way to use up an abundance of apples.

From our kitchen to yours,
Sydney Jones

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